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    The New York Metropolitan Chapter of the Victorian Society in America presents a lecture to benefit the Margot Gayle Fund for the Preservation of Victorian Heritage

    Friday, March 27, 2015

    A Time of Contradictions: The Victorian Era in Charleston
    by Brandy Culp, Curator, Historic...
    see more The New York Metropolitan Chapter of the Victorian Society in America presents a lecture to benefit the Margot Gayle Fund for the Preservation of Victorian Heritage

    Friday, March 27, 2015

    A Time of Contradictions: The Victorian Era in Charleston
    by Brandy Culp, Curator, Historic Charleston Foundation

    Time: 6:00pm lecture; 7:00 pm reception

    Price: $50 Members; $65 Non-members/guests

    Location: The English-Speaking Union; 144 East 39th Street; New York, NY 10016

    Paid registration required; Please reply by mail or visit www.vicsocny.org
    R.S.V.P. by March 23

    The Victorian era was one of the most exuberant and tumultuous epochs in Charleston’s history. Brandy S. Culp, curator at Historic Charleston Foundation, will explore the stark contrast between the city’s cultural ethos before and after the Civil War. The cataclysmic aftermath of the war, followed by natural disasters such as a major earthquake and numerous hurricanes, had a decisive impact on the city’s material culture and built environment. Ms. Culp will illustrate how the Victorian era in Charleston was a time of contradictions and was characterized by both prosperity and poverty as well as loss and preservation.

    Before joining Historic Charleston Foundation, Brandy S. Culp worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and conducted research for the exhibition “Art and the Empire City: New York, 1825-1861.” She later served as the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago. Ms. Culp leads projects for the preservation of Historic Charleston Foundation’s collection of fine and decorative arts and is responsible for interpreting the interiors of the Nathaniel Russell (1808) and Aiken-Rhett (c. 1820) House Museums. She is co-author of the book “Grandeur Preserved: The House Museums of Historic Charleston Foundation.”

    The Margot Gayle Fund was created in 2003 to honor the eminent preservationist and one of the founders of the Victorian Society in America. The fund enables the Chapter to make monetary grants for projects for the preservation, conservation and dissemination of Victorian material culture in the New York City metropolitan area.