• Timothy Ryan Mendenhall posted an article

    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is the last of the four write ups from the recipients of...

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    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is the last of the four write ups from the recipients of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award. 

     

    Despite working at the Frick Art Reference Library for several years, I had never attended an ARLIS conference.  As a part-time FARL cataloger with a full-time job in an academic setting, traveling to attend an ARLIS national conference would have been difficult to justify to my primary employer.  Even attending the local chapter events of ARLIS-NY is a challenge, as my primary workplace is not focused on art resources.  So when the 46th Annual Conference was scheduled for New York, I knew I could not pass up the opportunity to attend and engage more deeply with ARLIS.

     

    At the Frick, I primarily catalog European materials, chiefly 19th and 20th century Central and Eastern European catalogs and exhibition ephemera.  My goal at the conference was to attend the various cataloging sessions: Cataloging Section, Cataloging Problems Discussion Group, and the Cataloging Advisory Committee, as well as sessions on metadata migration and the ARTFRAME project.  On behalf of my primary employer, Fordham University, I was also interested in attending sessions on the changing landscape of scholarly publishing, digital scholarship, and copyright issues.

     

    Attending the three primary cataloging meetings enabled me to get a better handle on the discourse surrounding cataloging art resources and some of the special issues affecting the description of art resources.  Notably, there was criticism of some of the prescriptions of RDA and Library of Congress, and participating in these conversations will definitely inform my future work.  Having recently completed review for the Program for Cooperative Cataloging-BIBCO, which closely adheres to RDA and Library of Congress practice, I’ve had a number of specific questions about how to navigate between the recommendations of the ARLIS-CAC and BIBCO, many of which were addressed in discussion.

     

    At the Cataloging Section meeting, I was excited to hear about Kelly Swickard’s implementation of the newly defined MARC fields for creator characteristics, in conjunction with the similarly recently released Library of Congress Demographic Group Terms (LCDGT) thesaurus, on the Maryland Institute College of Art’s zine collection.  Using these new MARC fields and the LCDGT raises a number of ethical and theoretical questions, particularly pertaining to bias in cataloging, and it was exciting to hear and participate in the related discussions. This issue also came up at the LGBTQ+ Special Interest Group where the recently released monograph Cruising the Library, which explores issues of bias throughout the history of cataloging and classification, was discussed.

     

    Above all, it was beneficial to be able to meet one-on-one with colleagues, even some fellow New Yorkers, whom I’ve only ever encountered via email and listservs.  In my experience, nothing can replace this face-to-face contact for building relationships and collaborations.  Now that I have a better sense of the structure and culture of the technical services divisions within ARLIS, I am looking forward to engaging further, and I hope to volunteer in the future to serve on these committees.

     

    Timothy Ryan Mendenhall, Metadata Librarian, Columbia University Libraries and Assistant Cataloger, Frick Art Reference Library

  • Anna Holbert posted an article

    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new...

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    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is the third of four write ups from the recipients of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award. 

    This past February, as a recipient of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award, I was able to attend the 46th annual ARLIS/NA conference in New York City, with this year’s theme being Out of Bounds. As a first time attendee, I enjoyed the opportunity to learn about a variety of topics, make new acquaintances, and gain inspiration from all that the world of art libraries has to offer. As I near the completion of my graduate studies in Library and Information Science and the History of Art and Design at Pratt Institute, I am eager to continue to learn and experience as much as I can before officially embarking on my professional journey.

    I am also a Pratt fellow at the Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and my time there has afforded me many chances to familiarize myself with art librarianship and the role that research libraries play within arts institutions. Hoping to build upon that knowledge, I attended sessions on a variety of topics including: zines, provenance research, and how art libraries are effectively utilizing social media to engage with wider audiences. I appreciated how this conference acted as a forum for sharing knowledge, facilitating discussion, and encouraging collaboration within the field. I found it reassuring to meet so many different librarians from various institutions both across North America and further abroad who share the same forward-looking vision for art libraries. Through our conversations, I took comfort in knowing that there are many options available to me upon receiving my degree, and that there’s so much more to art librarianship to discover. I would like to thank the Celine Palatsky Travel Award Committee for providing me with the opportunity to experience this year’s conference, and I look forward to attending for many years to come.

     

    Anna Holbert, MSLIS, MS History of Art & Design Candidate, Pratt Institute

  • kelsey gallagher posted an article

    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is...

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    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is the second of four write ups from the recipients of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award. 

     

    I was fortunate to be among the individuals awarded ARLIS/NA New York’s Celine Palatsky Travel Award for the 2018 ARLIS/NA Out of Bounds Conference.  I am currently a graduate student at Pratt Institute, pursuing a dual Master’s degree in Library Information Sciences and Art and Design History; I am also the Acquisitions Technician at the  School of Visual Arts (SVA) Library.  Attending this conference, not only provided me with insight into the field of art librarianship, but the experience also presented me with new information about library and information science that I have been able to apply to both my studies and my professional job.

     

    I attended the conference for three full days: participating in every session I was able to, speaking to as many professionals as I could, and attending as many after-hours events for which my schedule would allow—including the amazing convocation ceremony and reception at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine.  I attended a variety of sessions, though my favorites tended to be the ones that were mainly lecture-based. Indeed, my favorite was a presentation that was part of the session Accessing Visual Culture: Deconstructing the Intellectual and Physical Challenges of Making Visual Content Accessible for Research, in which librarian Jerrold Shiroma gave a fast (yet thrilling and comprehensive) overview of the history of graffiti. He touched upon how graffiti is physically viewed; how it has been stigmatized; the different ways to regard it; and how it can be archived and presented in a digital world.

     

    Another exciting aspect of my Out of Bounds experience was being able to see my co-workers from SVA and a current professor from Pratt present.  My co-workers David Pemberton and Phoebe Stein presented in Different by Design: How Art Librarians are Undertaking User Experience. SVA Associate Director, Rebecca Clark, presented in Libraries Resist, and my professor, Emily Drabinski, presented in Thinking Outside the Bounds of the Typical Library: A Spotlight on Three New York City-based Libraries and Archives.

     

    I thank ARLIS/NA, the organizers of the Celine Palatasky Travel Award, and my Director at SVA, Caitlin Kilgallen, for giving me the means and opportunity to attend such a lively and intellectually stimulating conference!  I hope to attend for years to come!

     

    Kelsey Gallagher, Acquisitions Technician, School of Visual Arts Library

  • Emily Dunne posted an article

    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new...

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    As the 2018 ARLIS/NA conference did not involve major travel for our members, ARLIS/NA New York was able to make four awards available to students and new professionals to cover the cost of registration. Below is the first of four write ups from the recipients of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award. 

     

    Thanks to the generous support of the Celine Palatsky Travel Award, I was honored not only to attend, but to moderate a panel for the 46thARLIS/NA Annual Conference held in New York City at the end of February. This was my second time attending ARLIS/NA’s Annual Conference, and my first experience moderating a panel discussion.

    As the Archivist and Associate Librarian at the International Center of Photography (ICP), I was excited to reconnect and meet with other librarians who specialize in photography at the Photography SIG meeting. At last year’s meeting, the SIG proposed a panel for the 2018 conference: Photography and Books Across Boundaries in Art Libraries, Archives, and Museum Collections, which I was honored to end up moderating. After the presentations from Isotta Poggi, Deirdre Donohue and Emily Weirich, as well as an impromptu dance performance by Emily Weirich and me, we discussed the photobook and the parallels of the three presentations. The concept of “copies” and their ability to encourage scholarship was discussed; scholars and information professionals have the ability to analyze and re-contextualize artworks through photography, reproductions in books, and now digital objects.

    Another highlight of the conference was the workshop, From the Margins to the Center: Cultivating a Critical, Reflective, and Radical Practice in Art Librarianship, where we were encouraged to support social justice through our roles as information professionals. The workshop conductors’ message of the importance of social justice has stayed with me. My current project as Archivist at ICP consists of creating the finding aid for the papers of our institution's founder, Cornell Capa. In processing these documents I've been reminded of how ICP has been dedicated to social justice and continues to strive for that goal; our current library exhibition and programming is focused on acquiring the works of queer, gender non-binary, and people of color creators. Many of the workshop exercises focused on recognizing privileges, discussing what representation in libraries and archives means, and noting that the library and archive should be conscious in their collecting.

    I am looking forward to the next ARLIS/NA conference, where I hope to grow and maybe even present at a session myself! Thank you again to the New York Chapter for selecting me as a recipient of the award and to the women with whom I shared a panel.

    Emily Peterson Dunne, Associate Librarian & Archivist, International Center of Photography

    Image credit: Victor Sira